Teaching Students with Disabilities – Accommodating Students with Dyslexia

Dyslexia, according to the dictionary, is a general term for disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols, but that do not affect general intelligence. Teaching students with dyslexia can be a challenging task, but not impossible.

Here are some pointers to help you with the education of these children of god!

The following will help you with engaging the students’ interest in the topic.

  • Maintaining a daily routine helps students who have a problem learning things.
  • Providing graphic organizers like outline charts or blank webs to be filled in during presentations can help students co relate between topics and concepts.
  • New or complicated information can be relayed in small steps that enable effective absorption of knowledge.
  • Along with verbal information, if teachers use handouts or other visuals, it becomes easy for students to understand material.
  • The teacher can write vocabulary words or pointers on the chalk board or overhead prior to the presentation. This will be effective later on when the students will co relate chains
  • A balance between large groups and small groups and amongst oral and visual perception should be maintained at all times.
  • A daily revision of previously learned lessons help students connect effectively to things taught anew. This practice should be emphasized.
  • It is very helpful to encourage students to repeat instructions in their own words to help them understand them.

Dyslexia students have various kinds of problems. For instance, some may have problem in oral presentation, some may have trouble spelling words correctly, and some may be unable to write letters or numbers, some may not be comfortable in group discussions and some may be unable to speak or visualize at a fast pace. Apart from this, teachers need to keep in mind that every student is different and has a different speed of assessing and understanding things. The following will be helpful in improving students’ response:

  • Some students may be able to answer in multiple choice selection or underlining methods as opposed to writing. Students who have problem writing their answers can be provided slates or individual chalk boards or they could be provided with extra writing space in papers.1100_9_things_you_shouldnt_say_to_your_child
  • Students can maintain an assignment diary or a calendar to note down deadlines, test dates, and other important things. They may even note done home assignments in them to keep track.
  • It is encouraged to give handouts or copies to dyslexia students rather than allowing them to copy wherever possible.
  • Students may have problem in maintain columns while performing mathematical operations. To solve this, they should be encouraged to turn the single lined notebooks vertically. It is certainly helpful!
  • To help students manage time effectively during exams, implication signs can be used to highlight important questions and matter.
  • Teacher can design worksheets starting with easy problems to tough ones. Success in the beginning motivates students.
  • Number lines, calculators, etc are helpful for students once they understand the mathematical operations so their use should be allowed.
  • Display of completed sample assignments help students to understand what is expected of them, thus drawing satisfactory results.
  • Pairing up peers is very helpful. Peers with different abilities may be paired to help during exams, laboratory work, etc. For instance, a peer can be assigned to read out mathematical problems to peers who have issues with reading.
  • Students who have issues regarding completing deadlines due to their slow writing speed or other such disabilities should be given extra time to turn in their work.

Hopefully the above mentioned points were helpful enough!

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